natural wine


We’ve just put up a guest post over on Insects & Wine, with the wonderful title of ‘Sophisticated and whimsical, elegant and messy,’ (for which I claim no credit). It’s a great summary of the Insects & Wine pairing evening we hosted at the end of November at Trinity College, Cambridge, written by Sioned Cox, one of the attendees, who was also one of the people who helped out with the preparation for the...

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Pét Nat. It is short for pétillant naturel (naturally sparkling), a particular type of sparkling wine. I’ve only come across it in the last year or so, although I’ve found references on the web going back a few years earlier. It doesn’t seem to generate much coverage in the press, except for noting it’s a new trend, and apparently big with hipsters. But what is it? Pét Nat is wine that finishes fermenting in the bottle. It undergoes...

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Orange wine

Orange wine


Posted By on Jul 13, 2015

  Sometimes it is. Or at least –ish. Often it isn’t, being more of a golden yellow, or amber, or some other colour, as the photo suggests. But the colour isn’t all that interesting, except for what it is indicative of. So what is ‘orange wine’? In addition to not always being orange, it also isn’t made from oranges, as I’ve been asked more than once. Orange wine is, essentially, a white wine made in the manner of a red one. By...

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Anthroenology are pleased to announce that we will be presenting at the Amsterdam Symposium on the History of Food in January 2016. The Symposium topic is ‘Fire, Knives and Fridges,’ and we will be talking about ‘The unproduction of wine: eliding technology in natural and post-modern wine making.‘ For more information, see our Talks page: http://www.anthroenology.org/talks/ or the Symposium’s page, here:...

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Guest blog


Posted By on Mar 30, 2015

We have a guest post over at the Future of Food / Oxford Food Forum: http://www.futureoffood.ox.ac.uk/food-security-forum/blog/market-sustainable-wine Or: http://bit.ly/1xs4mng  ...

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What follows is the third and final part of a lightly edited version of an informal talk I gave recently at Newnham College, University of Cambridge. I’ve divided it up into three parts due to its length. Given that this was an informal presentation, I didn’t bother referencing it. In this version, I’ve added a few suggested readings at the end of the last post.   Let me now turn to the final period I want to talk about – from...

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